Едкий пепел добрался до Германии, десятки рейсов отменены

25 Мая 2011, 14:23

Фото AFP

Sheep graze in a field in the haze of ash caused by the eruption of the Grimsvoetn volcano at Geirland Farm in Kirkjubaejarklaustur, East Iceland on May 24, 2011. The ongoing eruption has shown the most violent start ever registered at Grimsvoetn, at the heart of the Vatnajoekull glacier, and the peak of its plume towered at around twice the height of the column spewed out last year by Eyjafjoell. AFP PHOTO / AGNES VALDIMARSDOTTIR , An information board shows cancelled flights at Berlin's Airport Schoenefeld on May 25, 2011, as traffic is disturbed due to ashes spewing from Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano. Ash pouring from the Icelandic volcano reached northern Germany, forcing the closure of airports from Hamburg to Berlin, amid fears European air traffic could soon suffer further disruptions. The cloud is the second in barely a year from an Icelandic volcano to disrupt European air traffic. AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by Eumetsat on May 25, 2011 shows dust concentration over Europe. Activity at Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano has stopped and its flight-halting ash plume has almost disappeared, experts and authorities said today, stressing though it's too early to declare the eruption over."There has been no activity since about 0200 GMT this morning," Sigthrudur Armannsdottir, a geologist at the Icelandic Meteorological Office, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT , Airline passengers are pictured at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers lie on the terminal floor as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers sleep as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers sleep on the terminal floor as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO/STRINGER , A cloud of ash decends on the settlement of Vik near the Grimsvoetn volcano on Iceland on May 23, 2011. Activity at Iceland's erupting volcano has slowed significantly and its flight-halting ash plume has dropped to a quarter of its peak of 20 kilometres (12 miles), experts in Iceland said on May 24, 2011. "There is less activity... A lot less of the ash is going into the atmosphere," Petur Matthiasson, a spokesman for Iceland's Civil Protection and Emrgency Management Administration, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / Vilheldm Gunnarsson = ICELAND OUT , A man walks over a field in the settlement of Vik near the Grimsvoetn volcano on Iceland on May 23, 2011. Activity at Iceland's erupting volcano has slowed significantly and its flight-halting ash plume has dropped to a quarter of its peak of 20 kilometres (12 miles), experts in Iceland said on May 24. "There is less activity... A lot less of the ash is going into the atmosphere," Petur Matthiasson, a spokesman for Iceland's Civil Protection and Emrgency Management Administration, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / Thorvaldur Kristmundsson = ICELAND OUT
Sheep graze in a field in the haze of ash caused by the eruption of the Grimsvoetn volcano at Geirland Farm in Kirkjubaejarklaustur, East Iceland on May 24, 2011. The ongoing eruption has shown the most violent start ever registered at Grimsvoetn, at the heart of the Vatnajoekull glacier, and the peak of its plume towered at around twice the height of the column spewed out last year by Eyjafjoell. AFP PHOTO / AGNES VALDIMARSDOTTIR , An information board shows cancelled flights at Berlin's Airport Schoenefeld on May 25, 2011, as traffic is disturbed due to ashes spewing from Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano. Ash pouring from the Icelandic volcano reached northern Germany, forcing the closure of airports from Hamburg to Berlin, amid fears European air traffic could soon suffer further disruptions. The cloud is the second in barely a year from an Icelandic volcano to disrupt European air traffic. AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by Eumetsat on May 25, 2011 shows dust concentration over Europe. Activity at Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano has stopped and its flight-halting ash plume has almost disappeared, experts and authorities said today, stressing though it's too early to declare the eruption over."There has been no activity since about 0200 GMT this morning," Sigthrudur Armannsdottir, a geologist at the Icelandic Meteorological Office, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT , Airline passengers are pictured at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers lie on the terminal floor as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER
Sheep graze in a field in the haze of ash caused by the eruption of the Grimsvoetn volcano at Geirland Farm in Kirkjubaejarklaustur, East Iceland on May 24, 2011. The ongoing eruption has shown the most violent start ever registered at Grimsvoetn, at the heart of the Vatnajoekull glacier, and the peak of its plume towered at around twice the height of the column spewed out last year by Eyjafjoell. AFP PHOTO / AGNES VALDIMARSDOTTIR , An information board shows cancelled flights at Berlin's Airport Schoenefeld on May 25, 2011, as traffic is disturbed due to ashes spewing from Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano. Ash pouring from the Icelandic volcano reached northern Germany, forcing the closure of airports from Hamburg to Berlin, amid fears European air traffic could soon suffer further disruptions. The cloud is the second in barely a year from an Icelandic volcano to disrupt European air traffic. AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by Eumetsat on May 25, 2011 shows dust concentration over Europe. Activity at Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano has stopped and its flight-halting ash plume has almost disappeared, experts and authorities said today, stressing though it's too early to declare the eruption over."There has been no activity since about 0200 GMT this morning," Sigthrudur Armannsdottir, a geologist at the Icelandic Meteorological Office, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT , Airline passengers are pictured at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers lie on the terminal floor as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers sleep as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers sleep on the terminal floor as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER
Sheep graze in a field in the haze of ash caused by the eruption of the Grimsvoetn volcano at Geirland Farm in Kirkjubaejarklaustur, East Iceland on May 24, 2011. The ongoing eruption has shown the most violent start ever registered at Grimsvoetn, at the heart of the Vatnajoekull glacier, and the peak of its plume towered at around twice the height of the column spewed out last year by Eyjafjoell. AFP PHOTO / AGNES VALDIMARSDOTTIR , An information board shows cancelled flights at Berlin's Airport Schoenefeld on May 25, 2011, as traffic is disturbed due to ashes spewing from Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano. Ash pouring from the Icelandic volcano reached northern Germany, forcing the closure of airports from Hamburg to Berlin, amid fears European air traffic could soon suffer further disruptions. The cloud is the second in barely a year from an Icelandic volcano to disrupt European air traffic. AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by Eumetsat on May 25, 2011 shows dust concentration over Europe. Activity at Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano has stopped and its flight-halting ash plume has almost disappeared, experts and authorities said today, stressing though it's too early to declare the eruption over."There has been no activity since about 0200 GMT this morning," Sigthrudur Armannsdottir, a geologist at the Icelandic Meteorological Office, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT , Airline passengers are pictured at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers lie on the terminal floor as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers sleep as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers sleep on the terminal floor as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO/STRINGER
Sheep graze in a field in the haze of ash caused by the eruption of the Grimsvoetn volcano at Geirland Farm in Kirkjubaejarklaustur, East Iceland on May 24, 2011. The ongoing eruption has shown the most violent start ever registered at Grimsvoetn, at the heart of the Vatnajoekull glacier, and the peak of its plume towered at around twice the height of the column spewed out last year by Eyjafjoell. AFP PHOTO / AGNES VALDIMARSDOTTIR , An information board shows cancelled flights at Berlin's Airport Schoenefeld on May 25, 2011, as traffic is disturbed due to ashes spewing from Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano. Ash pouring from the Icelandic volcano reached northern Germany, forcing the closure of airports from Hamburg to Berlin, amid fears European air traffic could soon suffer further disruptions. The cloud is the second in barely a year from an Icelandic volcano to disrupt European air traffic. AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by Eumetsat on May 25, 2011 shows dust concentration over Europe. Activity at Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano has stopped and its flight-halting ash plume has almost disappeared, experts and authorities said today, stressing though it's too early to declare the eruption over."There has been no activity since about 0200 GMT this morning," Sigthrudur Armannsdottir, a geologist at the Icelandic Meteorological Office, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT , Airline passengers are pictured at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers lie on the terminal floor as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers sleep as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER
Sheep graze in a field in the haze of ash caused by the eruption of the Grimsvoetn volcano at Geirland Farm in Kirkjubaejarklaustur, East Iceland on May 24, 2011. The ongoing eruption has shown the most violent start ever registered at Grimsvoetn, at the heart of the Vatnajoekull glacier, and the peak of its plume towered at around twice the height of the column spewed out last year by Eyjafjoell. AFP PHOTO / AGNES VALDIMARSDOTTIR , An information board shows cancelled flights at Berlin's Airport Schoenefeld on May 25, 2011, as traffic is disturbed due to ashes spewing from Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano. Ash pouring from the Icelandic volcano reached northern Germany, forcing the closure of airports from Hamburg to Berlin, amid fears European air traffic could soon suffer further disruptions. The cloud is the second in barely a year from an Icelandic volcano to disrupt European air traffic. AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by Eumetsat on May 25, 2011 shows dust concentration over Europe. Activity at Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano has stopped and its flight-halting ash plume has almost disappeared, experts and authorities said today, stressing though it's too early to declare the eruption over."There has been no activity since about 0200 GMT this morning," Sigthrudur Armannsdottir, a geologist at the Icelandic Meteorological Office, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT , Airline passengers are pictured at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER
Sheep graze in a field in the haze of ash caused by the eruption of the Grimsvoetn volcano at Geirland Farm in Kirkjubaejarklaustur, East Iceland on May 24, 2011. The ongoing eruption has shown the most violent start ever registered at Grimsvoetn, at the heart of the Vatnajoekull glacier, and the peak of its plume towered at around twice the height of the column spewed out last year by Eyjafjoell. AFP PHOTO / AGNES VALDIMARSDOTTIR , An information board shows cancelled flights at Berlin's Airport Schoenefeld on May 25, 2011, as traffic is disturbed due to ashes spewing from Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano. Ash pouring from the Icelandic volcano reached northern Germany, forcing the closure of airports from Hamburg to Berlin, amid fears European air traffic could soon suffer further disruptions. The cloud is the second in barely a year from an Icelandic volcano to disrupt European air traffic. AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE
Sheep graze in a field in the haze of ash caused by the eruption of the Grimsvoetn volcano at Geirland Farm in Kirkjubaejarklaustur, East Iceland on May 24, 2011. The ongoing eruption has shown the most violent start ever registered at Grimsvoetn, at the heart of the Vatnajoekull glacier, and the peak of its plume towered at around twice the height of the column spewed out last year by Eyjafjoell. AFP PHOTO / AGNES VALDIMARSDOTTIR , An information board shows cancelled flights at Berlin's Airport Schoenefeld on May 25, 2011, as traffic is disturbed due to ashes spewing from Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano. Ash pouring from the Icelandic volcano reached northern Germany, forcing the closure of airports from Hamburg to Berlin, amid fears European air traffic could soon suffer further disruptions. The cloud is the second in barely a year from an Icelandic volcano to disrupt European air traffic. AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by Eumetsat on May 25, 2011 shows dust concentration over Europe. Activity at Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano has stopped and its flight-halting ash plume has almost disappeared, experts and authorities said today, stressing though it's too early to declare the eruption over."There has been no activity since about 0200 GMT this morning," Sigthrudur Armannsdottir, a geologist at the Icelandic Meteorological Office, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT , Airline passengers are pictured at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers lie on the terminal floor as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers sleep as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers sleep on the terminal floor as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO/STRINGER , A cloud of ash decends on the settlement of Vik near the Grimsvoetn volcano on Iceland on May 23, 2011. Activity at Iceland's erupting volcano has slowed significantly and its flight-halting ash plume has dropped to a quarter of its peak of 20 kilometres (12 miles), experts in Iceland said on May 24, 2011. "There is less activity... A lot less of the ash is going into the atmosphere," Petur Matthiasson, a spokesman for Iceland's Civil Protection and Emrgency Management Administration, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / Vilheldm Gunnarsson = ICELAND OUT , A man walks over a field in the settlement of Vik near the Grimsvoetn volcano on Iceland on May 23, 2011. Activity at Iceland's erupting volcano has slowed significantly and its flight-halting ash plume has dropped to a quarter of its peak of 20 kilometres (12 miles), experts in Iceland said on May 24. "There is less activity... A lot less of the ash is going into the atmosphere," Petur Matthiasson, a spokesman for Iceland's Civil Protection and Emrgency Management Administration, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / Thorvaldur Kristmundsson = ICELAND OUT , A man clears the windshield of his car during daylight hours in Kirkjbaejarklaustur, near the Grimsvoetn volcano, on May 23, 2011. Activity at Iceland's erupting volcano has slowed significantly and its flight-halting ash plume has dropped to a quarter of its peak of 20 kilometres (12 miles), experts in Iceland said on May 24, 2011. "There is less activity... A lot less of the ash is going into the atmosphere," Petur Matthiasson, a spokesman for Iceland's Civil Protection and Emrgency Management Administration, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / Vilheldm Gunnarsson = ICELAND OUT
Sheep graze in a field in the haze of ash caused by the eruption of the Grimsvoetn volcano at Geirland Farm in Kirkjubaejarklaustur, East Iceland on May 24, 2011. The ongoing eruption has shown the most violent start ever registered at Grimsvoetn, at the heart of the Vatnajoekull glacier, and the peak of its plume towered at around twice the height of the column spewed out last year by Eyjafjoell. AFP PHOTO / AGNES VALDIMARSDOTTIR , An information board shows cancelled flights at Berlin's Airport Schoenefeld on May 25, 2011, as traffic is disturbed due to ashes spewing from Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano. Ash pouring from the Icelandic volcano reached northern Germany, forcing the closure of airports from Hamburg to Berlin, amid fears European air traffic could soon suffer further disruptions. The cloud is the second in barely a year from an Icelandic volcano to disrupt European air traffic. AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by Eumetsat on May 25, 2011 shows dust concentration over Europe. Activity at Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano has stopped and its flight-halting ash plume has almost disappeared, experts and authorities said today, stressing though it's too early to declare the eruption over."There has been no activity since about 0200 GMT this morning," Sigthrudur Armannsdottir, a geologist at the Icelandic Meteorological Office, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT
Sheep graze in a field in the haze of ash caused by the eruption of the Grimsvoetn volcano at Geirland Farm in Kirkjubaejarklaustur, East Iceland on May 24, 2011. The ongoing eruption has shown the most violent start ever registered at Grimsvoetn, at the heart of the Vatnajoekull glacier, and the peak of its plume towered at around twice the height of the column spewed out last year by Eyjafjoell. AFP PHOTO / AGNES VALDIMARSDOTTIR , An information board shows cancelled flights at Berlin's Airport Schoenefeld on May 25, 2011, as traffic is disturbed due to ashes spewing from Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano. Ash pouring from the Icelandic volcano reached northern Germany, forcing the closure of airports from Hamburg to Berlin, amid fears European air traffic could soon suffer further disruptions. The cloud is the second in barely a year from an Icelandic volcano to disrupt European air traffic. AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by Eumetsat on May 25, 2011 shows dust concentration over Europe. Activity at Iceland's Grimsvoetn volcano has stopped and its flight-halting ash plume has almost disappeared, experts and authorities said today, stressing though it's too early to declare the eruption over."There has been no activity since about 0200 GMT this morning," Sigthrudur Armannsdottir, a geologist at the Icelandic Meteorological Office, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT , Airline passengers are pictured at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers lie on the terminal floor as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers sleep as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers sleep on the terminal floor as they wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER , Airline passengers wait for flights at Edinburgh airport in Scotland, on May 24, 2011. Airlines halted hundreds of flights on Tuesday after a plume of ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland blew over Britain, even forcing US President Barack Obama to revise his travel plans. Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, Britain's flagship carrier British Airways was the first to suspend flights from London to Scotland. AFP PHOTO/STRINGER , A cloud of ash decends on the settlement of Vik near the Grimsvoetn volcano on Iceland on May 23, 2011. Activity at Iceland's erupting volcano has slowed significantly and its flight-halting ash plume has dropped to a quarter of its peak of 20 kilometres (12 miles), experts in Iceland said on May 24, 2011. "There is less activity... A lot less of the ash is going into the atmosphere," Petur Matthiasson, a spokesman for Iceland's Civil Protection and Emrgency Management Administration, told AFP. AFP PHOTO / Vilheldm Gunnarsson = ICELAND OUT
Sheep graze in a field in the haze of ash caused by the eruption of the Grimsvoetn volcano at Geirland Farm in Kirkjubaejarklaustur, East Iceland on May 24, 2011. The ongoing eruption has shown the most violent start ever registered at Grimsvoetn, at the heart of the Vatnajoekull glacier, and the peak of its plume towered at around twice the height of the column spewed out last year by Eyjafjoell. AFP PHOTO / AGNES VALDIMARSDOTTIR

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