"Господа полицейские" в России уже вываляли задержанного на асфальте

1 Марта 2011, 14:03

С сегодняшнего дня милиция России стала полицией. Парня, который возле МВД протестовал против переименования, повалили на землю двое бойцов. Фото AFP

A photo taken through a gap between two computer monitors shows a police officer on duty speaking by phone in a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1 and includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV , A police officer on duty sits in a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1. It includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV
A photo taken through a gap between two computer monitors shows a police officer on duty speaking by phone in a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1 and includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV , A police officer on duty sits in a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1. It includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV , A police officer retrieves his weapon, a Kalashnikov assault rifle, and ammunition clip at a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011, before going on patrol. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1. It includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV
A photo taken through a gap between two computer monitors shows a police officer on duty speaking by phone in a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1 and includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV
A photo taken through a gap between two computer monitors shows a police officer on duty speaking by phone in a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1 and includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV , A police officer on duty sits in a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1. It includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV , A police officer retrieves his weapon, a Kalashnikov assault rifle, and ammunition clip at a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011, before going on patrol. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1. It includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV , Police officers ground an opposition activist (C) protesting against the new name of the nation's law enforcement in front of the Interior Ministry headquarters (not seen) in Moscow on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1 and includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / ALEXEY SAZONOV
A photo taken through a gap between two computer monitors shows a police officer on duty speaking by phone in a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1 and includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV , A police officer on duty sits in a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1. It includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV , A police officer retrieves his weapon, a Kalashnikov assault rifle, and ammunition clip at a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011, before going on patrol. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1. It includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV , Police officers ground an opposition activist (C) protesting against the new name of the nation's law enforcement in front of the Interior Ministry headquarters (not seen) in Moscow on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1 and includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / ALEXEY SAZONOV , Police officers ground an opposition activist (C) protesting against the new name of the nation's law enforcement in front of the Interior Ministry headquarters (not seen) in Moscow on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1 and includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / ALEXEY SAZONOV , Police officers detain an opposition activist (C) protesting against the new name of the nation's law enforcement in front of the Interior Ministry headquarters (not seen) in Moscow on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1 and includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / ALEXEY SAZONOV
A photo taken through a gap between two computer monitors shows a police officer on duty speaking by phone in a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1 and includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV , A police officer on duty sits in a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1. It includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV , A police officer retrieves his weapon, a Kalashnikov assault rifle, and ammunition clip at a police station in the ancient Russian city of Veliky Novgorod, some 520 km northwest of Moscow, on March 1, 2011, before going on patrol. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1. It includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / MIKHAIL MORDASOV , Police officers ground an opposition activist (C) protesting against the new name of the nation's law enforcement in front of the Interior Ministry headquarters (not seen) in Moscow on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1 and includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / ALEXEY SAZONOV , Police officers ground an opposition activist (C) protesting against the new name of the nation's law enforcement in front of the Interior Ministry headquarters (not seen) in Moscow on March 1, 2011. The Law on Police, recently signed by President Dmitry Medvedev, takes effect on March 1 and includes, among other things, that the current name ?militia? will be replaced by ?police?, and it will entail considerable financial expenditure. The Interior Ministry, however, has not yet decided how much funding it will spend on new uniform and the replacement of certificates, signboards and stickers on cars. AFP PHOTO / ALEXEY SAZONOV

Вы сейчас просматриваете новость ""Господа полицейские" в России уже вываляли задержанного на асфальте". Другие Мировые новости смотрите в блоке "Последние новости"

Если вы нашли ошибку в тексте, выделите её мышью и нажмите Ctrl+Enter

Загрузка...

Комментарии

осталось символов: 1000 Правила комментирования