Мусульмане всего мира едут в Мекку

3 Ноября 2011, 17:32

Кульминацией паломничества станет стояние на горе Арафат, фото AFP

Pakistani vendors waits for customers at an animal market for the Muslim Eid al-Adha festival in Quetta on November 3, 2011. Muslims across the world are preparing to celebrate the annual festival of Eid al-Adha, or the Festival of Sacrifice, which marks the end of the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca and in commemoration of Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to show obedience to God. AFP PHOTO / BANARAS KHAN
Muslim piligrims pose for a picture as they rest in a street near the Grand Mosque in the Saudi holy city of Mecca on November 3, 2011. Around 2.5 million Muslims from around the world are expected to perform the Hajj, which this year peaks in the first week of November. AFP PHOTO/FAYEZ NURELDINE
A portrait of a Muslim piligrim near the Grand Mosque in the Saudi holy city of Mecca on November 3, 2011. Around 2.5 million Muslims from around the world are expected to perform the Hajj, which this year peaks in the first week of November. AFP PHOTO/FAYEZ NURELDINE
A Muslim piligrims is pictured near the Grand Mosque in the Saudi holy city of Mecca on November 3, 2011. Around 2.5 million Muslims from around the world are expected to perform the Hajj, which this year peaks in the first week of November. AFP PHOTO/FAYEZ NURELDINE
A Muslim piligrim rests in a street near the Grand Mosque in the Saudi holy city of Mecca on November 3, 2011. Around 2.5 million Muslims from around the world are expected to perform the Hajj, which this year peaks in the first week of November. AFP PHOTO/FAYEZ NURELDINE
A young Pakistani vendor sits next to his sheeps as he waits for customers at an animal market for the Muslim Eid al-Adha festival in Quetta on November 3, 2011. Muslims across the world are preparing to celebrate the annual festival of Eid al-Adha, or the Festival of Sacrifice, which marks the end of the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca and in commemoration of Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to show obedience to God. AFP PHOTO / BANARAS KHAN
A Pakistani vendor stands next to his goat as he waits for customers at an animal market for the Muslim Eid al-Adha festival in Quetta on November 3, 2011. Muslims across the world are preparing to celebrate the annual festival of Eid al-Adha, or the Festival of Sacrifice, which marks the end of the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca and in commemoration of Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to show obedience to God. AFP PHOTO / BANARAS KHAN
Pakistani Muslims buy goats at an animal market for the Muslim Eid al-Adha festival in Quetta on November 3, 2011. Muslims across the world are preparing to celebrate the annual festival of Eid al-Adha, or the Festival of Sacrifice, which marks the end of the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca and in commemoration of Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to show obedience to God. AFP PHOTO / BANARAS KHAN
Pakistani Muslim men load a camel in a truck at an animal market as they prepare for the Muslim Eid al-Adha festival in Karachi, on November 2, 2011. Muslims across the world are preparing to celebrate the annual festival of Eid al-Adha, or the Festival of Sacrifice, which marks the end of the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca and in commemoration of Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to show obedience to God. AFP PHOTO / RIZWAN TABASSUM
Pakistani Muslim men pull a camel to load it in a truck at an animal market as they prepare for the Muslim Eid al-Adha festival in Karachi, on November 2, 2011. Muslims across the world are preparing to celebrate the annual festival of Eid al-Adha, or the Festival of Sacrifice, which marks the end of the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca and in commemoration of Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to show obedience to God. AFP PHOTO / RIZWAN TABASSUM
Pakistani Muslim men load a camel in a truck at an animal market as they prepare for the Muslim Eid al-Adha festival in Karachi, on November 2, 2011. Muslims across the world are preparing to celebrate the annual festival of Eid al-Adha, or the Festival of Sacrifice, which marks the end of the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca and in commemoration of Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to show obedience to God. AFP PHOTO / RIZWAN TABASSUM
Muslim piligrims walk around the holy Kaaba inside Mecca's Grand Mosque on October 31, 2011, as more than 1.5 million Muslims have arrived in Saudi Arabia for the hajj pilgrimage to the shrine city, the world's largest annual human assembly which peaks on November 5, according to local state media. AFP PHOTO/FAYEZ NURELDINE
Tens of thousands of Muslim piligrims perform the evening prayer in the holy city's Grand Mosque on November 2, 2011. Mecca is already awash with pilgrims who have arrived from around the world for this year's hajj, whose rites begin on November 4. AFP PHOTO/FAYEZ NURELDINE
A general view shows hundreds of thousands of piligrims praying at Mecca's Grand Mosque on October 31, 2011, as more than 1.5 million Muslims have arrived in Saudi Arabia for the hajj pilgrimage to the shrine city, the world's largest annual human assembly which peaks on November 5, according to local state media. AFP PHOTO/FAYEZ NURELDINE
A Pakistani livestock trader walks with his camels as he waits for customers at a animal market for the Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha in Karachi on November 1, 2011. The annual Islamic holiday, which falls from November 7 to 8 in Pakistan, is marked by the ritual sacrifice after morning prayers of sheep, goats, cows and other livestock whose meat is then shared with the poor. AFP PHOTO / RIZWAN TABASSUM
A Pakistani livestock trader decorates a camel to attract customers at an animal market for the Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha in Karachi on November 1, 2011. The annual Islamic holiday, which falls from November 7 to 8 in Pakistan, is marked by the ritual sacrifice after morning prayers of sheep, goats, cows and other livestock whose meat is then shared with the poor. AFP PHOTO / RIZWAN TABASSUM
A Pakistani Muslim man shows his bull to customers at an animal market for the traditional animal sacrifice festival Eid in Islamabad on November 1, 2011. The annual Islamic holiday, which falls from November 7 to 8 in Pakistan, is marked by the ritual sacrifice after morning prayers of sheep, goats, cows and other livestock whose meat is then shared with the poor. AFP PHOTO/Farooq NAEEM

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