Независимость Южного Судана отпраздновали убийством коровы

8 Февраля 2011, 12:05

Жители Южного Судана проголосовали за независимость. В честь праздника принесли в жертву корову. Фото AFP

A Sudanese woman smiles as the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , Sudanese women smile following the results annouced by the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission on January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, are stacked and stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Southern Sudanese chief archivist Youssef Fulgensio Onyalla, who heads work to preserve the raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, holds a folder containing documents which is one of many stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (R), arrives with lawyer Jennifer Robinson at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court, in south-east London, on February 7, 2011. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears in a British court on Monday to fight his extradition to Sweden, with leaked details shedding new light on the rape and molestation accusations he faces. The two-day hearing at a high security London court will examine a Swedish arrest warrant for the 39-year-old Australian, who won worldwide notoriety for his website's release of thousands of secret US diplomatic cables. AFP PHOTO/Leon Neal , Southern Sudanese men ride a motorcycle past a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese walk under a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Holding candles southern Sudanese celebrate at former rebel leader Dr John Garang's grave the results of the January referendum on their secession from the north in the southern capital Juba, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL
A Sudanese woman smiles as the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , Sudanese women smile following the results annouced by the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission on January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, are stacked and stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Southern Sudanese chief archivist Youssef Fulgensio Onyalla, who heads work to preserve the raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, holds a folder containing documents which is one of many stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (R), arrives with lawyer Jennifer Robinson at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court, in south-east London, on February 7, 2011. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears in a British court on Monday to fight his extradition to Sweden, with leaked details shedding new light on the rape and molestation accusations he faces. The two-day hearing at a high security London court will examine a Swedish arrest warrant for the 39-year-old Australian, who won worldwide notoriety for his website's release of thousands of secret US diplomatic cables. AFP PHOTO/Leon Neal , Southern Sudanese men ride a motorcycle past a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese walk under a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Holding candles southern Sudanese celebrate at former rebel leader Dr John Garang's grave the results of the January referendum on their secession from the north in the southern capital Juba, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Sudanese celebrate the results of the January referendum on the secession of southern Sudan from the north in the capital Khartoum, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , A Sudanese man shows the palms of his hands after he dipped them in the blood of a sacrificial cow as he and others celebrate the results of the January referendum on the secession of southern Sudan from the north in the capital Khartoum, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , A Sudanese woman weeps as the results of the January referendum on the secession of southern Sudan from the north are announced in the capital Khartoum, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY
A Sudanese woman smiles as the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY
A Sudanese woman smiles as the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , Sudanese women smile following the results annouced by the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission on January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, are stacked and stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Southern Sudanese chief archivist Youssef Fulgensio Onyalla, who heads work to preserve the raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, holds a folder containing documents which is one of many stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL
A Sudanese woman smiles as the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , Sudanese women smile following the results annouced by the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission on January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, are stacked and stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Southern Sudanese chief archivist Youssef Fulgensio Onyalla, who heads work to preserve the raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, holds a folder containing documents which is one of many stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (R), arrives with lawyer Jennifer Robinson at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court, in south-east London, on February 7, 2011. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears in a British court on Monday to fight his extradition to Sweden, with leaked details shedding new light on the rape and molestation accusations he faces. The two-day hearing at a high security London court will examine a Swedish arrest warrant for the 39-year-old Australian, who won worldwide notoriety for his website's release of thousands of secret US diplomatic cables. AFP PHOTO/Leon Neal , Southern Sudanese men ride a motorcycle past a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese walk under a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL
A Sudanese woman smiles as the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , Sudanese women smile following the results annouced by the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission on January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, are stacked and stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Southern Sudanese chief archivist Youssef Fulgensio Onyalla, who heads work to preserve the raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, holds a folder containing documents which is one of many stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (R), arrives with lawyer Jennifer Robinson at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court, in south-east London, on February 7, 2011. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears in a British court on Monday to fight his extradition to Sweden, with leaked details shedding new light on the rape and molestation accusations he faces. The two-day hearing at a high security London court will examine a Swedish arrest warrant for the 39-year-old Australian, who won worldwide notoriety for his website's release of thousands of secret US diplomatic cables. AFP PHOTO/Leon Neal , Southern Sudanese men ride a motorcycle past a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese walk under a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Holding candles southern Sudanese celebrate at former rebel leader Dr John Garang's grave the results of the January referendum on their secession from the north in the southern capital Juba, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Sudanese celebrate the results of the January referendum on the secession of southern Sudan from the north in the capital Khartoum, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , A Sudanese man shows the palms of his hands after he dipped them in the blood of a sacrificial cow as he and others celebrate the results of the January referendum on the secession of southern Sudan from the north in the capital Khartoum, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , A Sudanese woman weeps as the results of the January referendum on the secession of southern Sudan from the north are announced in the capital Khartoum, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , A man wipes the brow of a Sudanese woman as she weeps as the results of the January referendum on the secession of southern Sudan from the north are announced in the capital Khartoum, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY
A Sudanese woman smiles as the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , Sudanese women smile following the results annouced by the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission on January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, are stacked and stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Southern Sudanese chief archivist Youssef Fulgensio Onyalla, who heads work to preserve the raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, holds a folder containing documents which is one of many stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (R), arrives with lawyer Jennifer Robinson at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court, in south-east London, on February 7, 2011. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears in a British court on Monday to fight his extradition to Sweden, with leaked details shedding new light on the rape and molestation accusations he faces. The two-day hearing at a high security London court will examine a Swedish arrest warrant for the 39-year-old Australian, who won worldwide notoriety for his website's release of thousands of secret US diplomatic cables. AFP PHOTO/Leon Neal , Southern Sudanese men ride a motorcycle past a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese walk under a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Holding candles southern Sudanese celebrate at former rebel leader Dr John Garang's grave the results of the January referendum on their secession from the north in the southern capital Juba, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Sudanese celebrate the results of the January referendum on the secession of southern Sudan from the north in the capital Khartoum, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , A Sudanese man shows the palms of his hands after he dipped them in the blood of a sacrificial cow as he and others celebrate the results of the January referendum on the secession of southern Sudan from the north in the capital Khartoum, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY
A Sudanese woman smiles as the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , Sudanese women smile following the results annouced by the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission on January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, are stacked and stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Southern Sudanese chief archivist Youssef Fulgensio Onyalla, who heads work to preserve the raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, holds a folder containing documents which is one of many stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (R), arrives with lawyer Jennifer Robinson at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court, in south-east London, on February 7, 2011. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears in a British court on Monday to fight his extradition to Sweden, with leaked details shedding new light on the rape and molestation accusations he faces. The two-day hearing at a high security London court will examine a Swedish arrest warrant for the 39-year-old Australian, who won worldwide notoriety for his website's release of thousands of secret US diplomatic cables. AFP PHOTO/Leon Neal , Southern Sudanese men ride a motorcycle past a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL
A Sudanese woman smiles as the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , Sudanese women smile following the results annouced by the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission on January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY
A Sudanese woman smiles as the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , Sudanese women smile following the results annouced by the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission on January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, are stacked and stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Southern Sudanese chief archivist Youssef Fulgensio Onyalla, who heads work to preserve the raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, holds a folder containing documents which is one of many stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (R), arrives with lawyer Jennifer Robinson at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court, in south-east London, on February 7, 2011. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears in a British court on Monday to fight his extradition to Sweden, with leaked details shedding new light on the rape and molestation accusations he faces. The two-day hearing at a high security London court will examine a Swedish arrest warrant for the 39-year-old Australian, who won worldwide notoriety for his website's release of thousands of secret US diplomatic cables. AFP PHOTO/Leon Neal , Southern Sudanese men ride a motorcycle past a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese walk under a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Holding candles southern Sudanese celebrate at former rebel leader Dr John Garang's grave the results of the January referendum on their secession from the north in the southern capital Juba, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Sudanese celebrate the results of the January referendum on the secession of southern Sudan from the north in the capital Khartoum, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY
A Sudanese woman smiles as the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , Sudanese women smile following the results annouced by the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission on January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, are stacked and stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Southern Sudanese chief archivist Youssef Fulgensio Onyalla, who heads work to preserve the raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, holds a folder containing documents which is one of many stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (R), arrives with lawyer Jennifer Robinson at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court, in south-east London, on February 7, 2011. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears in a British court on Monday to fight his extradition to Sweden, with leaked details shedding new light on the rape and molestation accusations he faces. The two-day hearing at a high security London court will examine a Swedish arrest warrant for the 39-year-old Australian, who won worldwide notoriety for his website's release of thousands of secret US diplomatic cables. AFP PHOTO/Leon Neal , Southern Sudanese men ride a motorcycle past a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese walk under a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Holding candles southern Sudanese celebrate at former rebel leader Dr John Garang's grave the results of the January referendum on their secession from the north in the southern capital Juba, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Sudanese celebrate the results of the January referendum on the secession of southern Sudan from the north in the capital Khartoum, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , A Sudanese man shows the palms of his hands after he dipped them in the blood of a sacrificial cow as he and others celebrate the results of the January referendum on the secession of southern Sudan from the north in the capital Khartoum, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , A Sudanese woman weeps as the results of the January referendum on the secession of southern Sudan from the north are announced in the capital Khartoum, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , A man wipes the brow of a Sudanese woman as she weeps as the results of the January referendum on the secession of southern Sudan from the north are announced in the capital Khartoum, on February 7, 2011. Southern Sudan was well on track to become the world's newest state after final results of its historic independence referendum showed that 98.83 percent of its people had voted for secession. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , The Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/PHIL MOORE
A Sudanese woman smiles as the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , Sudanese women smile following the results annouced by the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission on January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, are stacked and stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Southern Sudanese chief archivist Youssef Fulgensio Onyalla, who heads work to preserve the raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, holds a folder containing documents which is one of many stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (R), arrives with lawyer Jennifer Robinson at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court, in south-east London, on February 7, 2011. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears in a British court on Monday to fight his extradition to Sweden, with leaked details shedding new light on the rape and molestation accusations he faces. The two-day hearing at a high security London court will examine a Swedish arrest warrant for the 39-year-old Australian, who won worldwide notoriety for his website's release of thousands of secret US diplomatic cables. AFP PHOTO/Leon Neal , Southern Sudanese men ride a motorcycle past a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese walk under a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL
A Sudanese woman smiles as the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , Sudanese women smile following the results annouced by the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission on January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, are stacked and stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL
A Sudanese woman smiles as the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission announce the final results of January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , Sudanese women smile following the results annouced by the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission on January's independence referendum on February 7, 2011. Southerners voted overwhelmingly in favour of secession, with over 98% of ballots favouring independence. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, are stacked and stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PETER MARTELL Southern Sudanese chief archivist Youssef Fulgensio Onyalla, who heads work to preserve the raw documents that make up the history of the world?s newest nation to be, holds a folder containing documents which is one of many stored in a tent in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 1, 2011. The region's historical documents were badly damaged in the war, and many are now stored in this temporary tent while work continues to make digital copies. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (R), arrives with lawyer Jennifer Robinson at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court, in south-east London, on February 7, 2011. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears in a British court on Monday to fight his extradition to Sweden, with leaked details shedding new light on the rape and molestation accusations he faces. The two-day hearing at a high security London court will examine a Swedish arrest warrant for the 39-year-old Australian, who won worldwide notoriety for his website's release of thousands of secret US diplomatic cables. AFP PHOTO/Leon Neal , Southern Sudanese men ride a motorcycle past a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese walk under a billboard celebrating the choice of the south to separate Africa?s largest nation in two in the southern Sudanese capital Juba on February 7, 2011 hours before the expected announcement of the landmark independence referendum's final results. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL , Southern Sudanese from the Toposa ethnic group celebrate the choice of separation from the north in the Eastern Equatorian town of Kapoeta, near the border with Kenya, on February 5, 2011. Final results of Sudan's landmark independence referendum for the south due out on February 7, 2011 were expected to confirm a landslide vote for secession, paving the way in July for the creation of Africa's newest state. AFP PHOTO/PETER MARTELL

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