Гаити через год после землетрясения: страна в руинах и матч на костылях

12 Января 2011, 16:04

Фото AFP

Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2010 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2010 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A man places flowers on a cross at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , Haitians hold hands during a ceremony at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , A woman walks past a newly built wall on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Men clear debris before a destroyed building on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Men clear rubbish around a destroyed building on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2010 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A man places flowers on a cross at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , Haitians hold hands during a ceremony at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , A woman walks past a newly built wall on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Men clear debris before a destroyed building on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Men clear rubbish around a destroyed building on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , People walk amid rubble on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , People watch television amid rubble on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE.
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2010 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2010 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A man places flowers on a cross at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , Haitians hold hands during a ceremony at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , A woman walks past a newly built wall on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Men clear debris before a destroyed building on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Men clear rubbish around a destroyed building on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , People walk amid rubble on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , People watch television amid rubble on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , People watch television amid rubble on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Workers build a new structure on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE.
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2010 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A man places flowers on a cross at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , Haitians hold hands during a ceremony at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , A woman walks past a newly built wall on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Men clear debris before a destroyed building on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Men clear rubbish around a destroyed building on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , People walk amid rubble on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE.
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2010 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A man places flowers on a cross at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , Haitians hold hands during a ceremony at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2010 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A man places flowers on a cross at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , Haitians hold hands during a ceremony at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , A woman walks past a newly built wall on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Men clear debris before a destroyed building on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Men clear rubbish around a destroyed building on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , People walk amid rubble on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , People watch television amid rubble on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , People watch television amid rubble on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2010 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE.
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2010 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A man places flowers on a cross at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2010 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A man places flowers on a cross at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , Haitians hold hands during a ceremony at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , A woman walks past a newly built wall on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL
Workers clear debris and rubble on January 6, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A memorial mass is held on January 7, 2011 for the victims of the quake of January 12, 2010 in the rubble of the destroyed Sacre-Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. UN relief agencies on Friday defended their role in the much criticised aid effort after Haiti's devastating earthquake nearly a year ago, saying they had faced "apocalyptic" scenes. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A Haitian shows some collected iron from the rubble of a building that was destroyed by the last earthquake in Haiti, Port au Prince, January 8, 2011. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. Hector Retamal / AFP , Haitians clean up the debris in a house that was destroyed in the last earthquake of 2010 in Haiti, Puerto Principe, January 8, 2011. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SEBASTIAN SMITH Haitians drive pass the earthquake hit road January 8, 2011 in Leogane, 30 Km from Port-au-Prince. Leogane is the epicentre of January 12, 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. How much pain can a country take? One year after an earthquake crushed almost a quarter of a million of their people, Haitians are still finding out. The magnitude seven quake struck at 4:53 p.m., January 12, just as children in their smart uniforms, satchels and ribbons spilled out across the bustling capital of Port-au-Prince, overlooking the shining Caribbean sea. Within seconds, more than 220,000 people were dead and almost two million homeless. Haitians call the quake "Goudou Goudou," the sound that came when the world collapsed. They have not yet invented names for the misery that followed -- and continues to pile up. Hurricanes, flooding, and a cholera outbreak that killed 3,650 and sickened 170,000 compounded the natural disasters afflicting the country of 10 million. AFP PHOTO / Thony BELIZAIRE , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Hatian man observes the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP The ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , WITH STORY OF STEBASTIAN SMITH. HAITI-QUAKE-1 YEAR-WRAP A Haitian woman attends Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , TOPSHOTS Haitians taking part January 9, 2011 in a Mass at the ruins of the Cathedral ahead of the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister told AFP as the anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake approached. The grim assessment by Jacques Gabriel, minister for public works, transport and communication, reflects how Haiti is struggling a year after the January 12 earthquake killed more than 220,000 and left some two million people homeless -- about 20 percent of the population. AFP PHOTO Thony BELIZAIRE. , A group of women collects water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , A Haitian girl carries plastic buckets to collect water in the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , Haitian children play inside the camp Acra, Delmas, January 9, 2011 in Puerto Principe. On January 12, Haiti commemorates the anniversary of the earthquake which killed more than 250.000 people. More than 800,000 people still live in camps a year after Haiti's devastating earthquake, but that is nearly half the number initially left homeless, the International Organization for Migration said January 9, 2011. The UN group noted that 1.5 million people lost their homes in the January 12, 2010 quake, and as recently as September there were 1.35 million people living in the makeshift refugee camps. But in recent months the refugee population began to shrink significantly, dropping to just over a million in November and now going below a million for the first time since the crisis began. AFP PHOTO / Hector Retamal , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and by other circumstances, compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake and other players disabled by other circumstances compete during a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , CORRECTION - YEAR Football players, disabled from last year's earthquake, prepare to compete in a match on January 10, 2011 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , A football player, disabled from last year's earthquake, celebrates a goal during a match with other disabled players on January 10, 2010 at Sylvio Cator stadium in Port-au-Prince. An estimated 2,000 to 6,000 people were left with some kind of disability by the January 12, 20190 earthquake which struck across all classes and social strata in Haiti. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , Former US president and UN special envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton visits a rubble recycling site on January 11, 2011 in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Carrefour-Feuille. Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Thony BELIZAIRE , A man places flowers on a cross at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , Haitians hold hands during a ceremony at St. Christophe, where thousands of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake are buried, in Port-au-Prince on January 11, 2011, Haiti began two days of remembrance ceremonies in honor of the nearly quarter million people who died in an earthquake that leveled the impoverished country a year ago. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL , A woman walks past a newly built wall on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL , Men clear debris before a destroyed building on January 5, 2011 in Port-au-Prince. One year after Haiti's earthquake, only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a new report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. "This has been a year of indecision and it has put Haiti's recovery on hold," said Roland Van Hauwermeiren, country director for Oxfam in Haiti. AFP PHOTO / Hector RETAMAL

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