Исландию завалило едким пеплом, а самолеты называют в честь вулкана

24 Мая 2011, 11:12

В стране идет крупнейшее извержение вулкана Гримсвотн за последние 100 лет. Фото AFP

Lightning is seen through a cloud of smoke and ash pouring out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano in Grmsvoetn, Iceland, on May 22, 2011. Safety experts warned that ash from an erupting Icelandic volcano that closed the country's airspace may blow across large swathes of western Europe, raising fears of new flight chaos. Air safety officials said ash from the Grimsvoetn eruption may reach north Scotland by May 24 before sweeping across Britain to hit France and Spain two days later. AFP PHOTO / RAGNAR AXELSSON ***ICELAND OUT*** , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by the NASA Modis on May 22, 2011 shows smoke billowing from the Grimsvoetn, Iceland's most active volcano. Authorities shut Iceland's airspace Sunday after the country's most active volcano began spewing ash cloud 20 kilometers into the sky, raising fears of a repeat of last year's flights chaos. While experts said the impact of the Grimsvoetn eruption should not be as far-reaching as the 2010 crisis, ash deposits were being sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west. AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS
Lightning is seen through a cloud of smoke and ash pouring out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano in Grmsvoetn, Iceland, on May 22, 2011. Safety experts warned that ash from an erupting Icelandic volcano that closed the country's airspace may blow across large swathes of western Europe, raising fears of new flight chaos. Air safety officials said ash from the Grimsvoetn eruption may reach north Scotland by May 24 before sweeping across Britain to hit France and Spain two days later. AFP PHOTO / RAGNAR AXELSSON ***ICELAND OUT*** , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by the NASA Modis on May 22, 2011 shows smoke billowing from the Grimsvoetn, Iceland's most active volcano. Authorities shut Iceland's airspace Sunday after the country's most active volcano began spewing ash cloud 20 kilometers into the sky, raising fears of a repeat of last year's flights chaos. While experts said the impact of the Grimsvoetn eruption should not be as far-reaching as the 2010 crisis, ash deposits were being sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west. AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS , A cloud of smoke and ash is seen over the Grimsvoetn volcano on Iceland on May 21, 2011. The cloud rising up from Grimsvoetn as a result of the eruption was seen first time around 1900 GMT and in less than an hour it had reached an altitude of 11 kilometres (6.8 miles)," according to the Icellandic meterological institute. AFP PHOTO
Lightning is seen through a cloud of smoke and ash pouring out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano in Grmsvoetn, Iceland, on May 22, 2011. Safety experts warned that ash from an erupting Icelandic volcano that closed the country's airspace may blow across large swathes of western Europe, raising fears of new flight chaos. Air safety officials said ash from the Grimsvoetn eruption may reach north Scotland by May 24 before sweeping across Britain to hit France and Spain two days later. AFP PHOTO / RAGNAR AXELSSON ***ICELAND OUT*** , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by the NASA Modis on May 22, 2011 shows smoke billowing from the Grimsvoetn, Iceland's most active volcano. Authorities shut Iceland's airspace Sunday after the country's most active volcano began spewing ash cloud 20 kilometers into the sky, raising fears of a repeat of last year's flights chaos. While experts said the impact of the Grimsvoetn eruption should not be as far-reaching as the 2010 crisis, ash deposits were being sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west. AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS , A cloud of smoke and ash is seen over the Grimsvoetn volcano on Iceland on May 21, 2011. The cloud rising up from Grimsvoetn as a result of the eruption was seen first time around 1900 GMT and in less than an hour it had reached an altitude of 11 kilometres (6.8 miles)," according to the Icellandic meterological institute. AFP PHOTO , US President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama (C) board Air Force One at the airport in Dublin on May 23, 2011 en route to London. Obama was forced to leave Ireland a day ahead of schedule May 23 to fly to London as a cloud of ash from an Icelandic volcano drifted towards Britain. AFP PHOTO / JEWEL SAMAD , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT/METOP" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by the Eumetsat on May 23, 2011 and taken by AVHRR Instrument on Metop-A on May 22 shows the ash cloud (reddish colour) billowing from the Grimsvoetn, Iceland's most active volcano. Authorities shut Iceland's airspace Sunday after the country's most active volcano began spewing ash cloud 20 kilometers into the sky, raising fears of a repeat of last year's flights chaos. While experts said the impact of the Grimsvoetn eruption should not be as far-reaching as the 2010 crisis, ash deposits were being sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west. AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT / METOP
Lightning is seen through a cloud of smoke and ash pouring out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano in Grmsvoetn, Iceland, on May 22, 2011. Safety experts warned that ash from an erupting Icelandic volcano that closed the country's airspace may blow across large swathes of western Europe, raising fears of new flight chaos. Air safety officials said ash from the Grimsvoetn eruption may reach north Scotland by May 24 before sweeping across Britain to hit France and Spain two days later. AFP PHOTO / RAGNAR AXELSSON ***ICELAND OUT*** , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by the NASA Modis on May 22, 2011 shows smoke billowing from the Grimsvoetn, Iceland's most active volcano. Authorities shut Iceland's airspace Sunday after the country's most active volcano began spewing ash cloud 20 kilometers into the sky, raising fears of a repeat of last year's flights chaos. While experts said the impact of the Grimsvoetn eruption should not be as far-reaching as the 2010 crisis, ash deposits were being sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west. AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS , A cloud of smoke and ash is seen over the Grimsvoetn volcano on Iceland on May 21, 2011. The cloud rising up from Grimsvoetn as a result of the eruption was seen first time around 1900 GMT and in less than an hour it had reached an altitude of 11 kilometres (6.8 miles)," according to the Icellandic meterological institute. AFP PHOTO , US President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama (C) board Air Force One at the airport in Dublin on May 23, 2011 en route to London. Obama was forced to leave Ireland a day ahead of schedule May 23 to fly to London as a cloud of ash from an Icelandic volcano drifted towards Britain. AFP PHOTO / JEWEL SAMAD , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT/METOP" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by the Eumetsat on May 23, 2011 and taken by AVHRR Instrument on Metop-A on May 22 shows the ash cloud (reddish colour) billowing from the Grimsvoetn, Iceland's most active volcano. Authorities shut Iceland's airspace Sunday after the country's most active volcano began spewing ash cloud 20 kilometers into the sky, raising fears of a repeat of last year's flights chaos. While experts said the impact of the Grimsvoetn eruption should not be as far-reaching as the 2010 crisis, ash deposits were being sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west. AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT / METOP , A SAS Boeing 737 aircraft takes off behind a stranded Iceland Air Boeing 757 aircraft, named after the Eyjafjoell volcano, at Arlanda airport north of Stockholm on May 23, 2011. The Eyjafjoell aircraft is parked at Arlanda, unable to return home, since the ash cloud from the Grimsvoetn volcano closed airports in Iceland on May 22. During last year's eruption at the neighbouring Eyjafjoell volcano, more than 100,000 flights were cancelled and eight million passengers stranded, dealing a harsh blow to the airline industry, particularly in Europe. AFP PHOTO / JOHAN NILSSON - SWEDEN OUT - , Tourists leave the Islandia Hotel in Nupur as ash continue to pour out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano on May 22, 2011. Ash deposits were sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik, some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west of the volcano, which has spewed an ash cloud about 20 kilometres into the sky. Less than 24 hours after the eruption began late Saturday, experts and authorities in Iceland said the volcanic activity had begun to decline. AFP PHOTO / Vilhelm Gunnarsson ***ICELAND OUT***
Lightning is seen through a cloud of smoke and ash pouring out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano in Grmsvoetn, Iceland, on May 22, 2011. Safety experts warned that ash from an erupting Icelandic volcano that closed the country's airspace may blow across large swathes of western Europe, raising fears of new flight chaos. Air safety officials said ash from the Grimsvoetn eruption may reach north Scotland by May 24 before sweeping across Britain to hit France and Spain two days later. AFP PHOTO / RAGNAR AXELSSON ***ICELAND OUT*** , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by the NASA Modis on May 22, 2011 shows smoke billowing from the Grimsvoetn, Iceland's most active volcano. Authorities shut Iceland's airspace Sunday after the country's most active volcano began spewing ash cloud 20 kilometers into the sky, raising fears of a repeat of last year's flights chaos. While experts said the impact of the Grimsvoetn eruption should not be as far-reaching as the 2010 crisis, ash deposits were being sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west. AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS , A cloud of smoke and ash is seen over the Grimsvoetn volcano on Iceland on May 21, 2011. The cloud rising up from Grimsvoetn as a result of the eruption was seen first time around 1900 GMT and in less than an hour it had reached an altitude of 11 kilometres (6.8 miles)," according to the Icellandic meterological institute. AFP PHOTO , US President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama (C) board Air Force One at the airport in Dublin on May 23, 2011 en route to London. Obama was forced to leave Ireland a day ahead of schedule May 23 to fly to London as a cloud of ash from an Icelandic volcano drifted towards Britain. AFP PHOTO / JEWEL SAMAD
Lightning is seen through a cloud of smoke and ash pouring out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano in Grmsvoetn, Iceland, on May 22, 2011. Safety experts warned that ash from an erupting Icelandic volcano that closed the country's airspace may blow across large swathes of western Europe, raising fears of new flight chaos. Air safety officials said ash from the Grimsvoetn eruption may reach north Scotland by May 24 before sweeping across Britain to hit France and Spain two days later. AFP PHOTO / RAGNAR AXELSSON ***ICELAND OUT*** , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by the NASA Modis on May 22, 2011 shows smoke billowing from the Grimsvoetn, Iceland's most active volcano. Authorities shut Iceland's airspace Sunday after the country's most active volcano began spewing ash cloud 20 kilometers into the sky, raising fears of a repeat of last year's flights chaos. While experts said the impact of the Grimsvoetn eruption should not be as far-reaching as the 2010 crisis, ash deposits were being sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west. AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS , A cloud of smoke and ash is seen over the Grimsvoetn volcano on Iceland on May 21, 2011. The cloud rising up from Grimsvoetn as a result of the eruption was seen first time around 1900 GMT and in less than an hour it had reached an altitude of 11 kilometres (6.8 miles)," according to the Icellandic meterological institute. AFP PHOTO , US President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama (C) board Air Force One at the airport in Dublin on May 23, 2011 en route to London. Obama was forced to leave Ireland a day ahead of schedule May 23 to fly to London as a cloud of ash from an Icelandic volcano drifted towards Britain. AFP PHOTO / JEWEL SAMAD , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT/METOP" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by the Eumetsat on May 23, 2011 and taken by AVHRR Instrument on Metop-A on May 22 shows the ash cloud (reddish colour) billowing from the Grimsvoetn, Iceland's most active volcano. Authorities shut Iceland's airspace Sunday after the country's most active volcano began spewing ash cloud 20 kilometers into the sky, raising fears of a repeat of last year's flights chaos. While experts said the impact of the Grimsvoetn eruption should not be as far-reaching as the 2010 crisis, ash deposits were being sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west. AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT / METOP , A SAS Boeing 737 aircraft takes off behind a stranded Iceland Air Boeing 757 aircraft, named after the Eyjafjoell volcano, at Arlanda airport north of Stockholm on May 23, 2011. The Eyjafjoell aircraft is parked at Arlanda, unable to return home, since the ash cloud from the Grimsvoetn volcano closed airports in Iceland on May 22. During last year's eruption at the neighbouring Eyjafjoell volcano, more than 100,000 flights were cancelled and eight million passengers stranded, dealing a harsh blow to the airline industry, particularly in Europe. AFP PHOTO / JOHAN NILSSON - SWEDEN OUT - , Tourists leave the Islandia Hotel in Nupur as ash continue to pour out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano on May 22, 2011. Ash deposits were sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik, some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west of the volcano, which has spewed an ash cloud about 20 kilometres into the sky. Less than 24 hours after the eruption began late Saturday, experts and authorities in Iceland said the volcanic activity had begun to decline. AFP PHOTO / Vilhelm Gunnarsson ***ICELAND OUT*** , Sheep farmers try to round up a flock as they walk through a cloud of ash pouring out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano in Mulakot on May 22, 2011. Ash deposits were sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik, some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west of the volcano, which has spewed an ash cloud about 20 kilometres into the sky. Less than 24 hours after the eruption began late Saturday, experts and authorities in Iceland said the volcanic activity had begun to decline. AFP PHOTO / Vilhelm Gunnarsson ***ICELAND OUT***
Lightning is seen through a cloud of smoke and ash pouring out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano in Grmsvoetn, Iceland, on May 22, 2011. Safety experts warned that ash from an erupting Icelandic volcano that closed the country's airspace may blow across large swathes of western Europe, raising fears of new flight chaos. Air safety officials said ash from the Grimsvoetn eruption may reach north Scotland by May 24 before sweeping across Britain to hit France and Spain two days later. AFP PHOTO / RAGNAR AXELSSON ***ICELAND OUT***
Lightning is seen through a cloud of smoke and ash pouring out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano in Grmsvoetn, Iceland, on May 22, 2011. Safety experts warned that ash from an erupting Icelandic volcano that closed the country's airspace may blow across large swathes of western Europe, raising fears of new flight chaos. Air safety officials said ash from the Grimsvoetn eruption may reach north Scotland by May 24 before sweeping across Britain to hit France and Spain two days later. AFP PHOTO / RAGNAR AXELSSON ***ICELAND OUT*** , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by the NASA Modis on May 22, 2011 shows smoke billowing from the Grimsvoetn, Iceland's most active volcano. Authorities shut Iceland's airspace Sunday after the country's most active volcano began spewing ash cloud 20 kilometers into the sky, raising fears of a repeat of last year's flights chaos. While experts said the impact of the Grimsvoetn eruption should not be as far-reaching as the 2010 crisis, ash deposits were being sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west. AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS , A cloud of smoke and ash is seen over the Grimsvoetn volcano on Iceland on May 21, 2011. The cloud rising up from Grimsvoetn as a result of the eruption was seen first time around 1900 GMT and in less than an hour it had reached an altitude of 11 kilometres (6.8 miles)," according to the Icellandic meterological institute. AFP PHOTO , US President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama (C) board Air Force One at the airport in Dublin on May 23, 2011 en route to London. Obama was forced to leave Ireland a day ahead of schedule May 23 to fly to London as a cloud of ash from an Icelandic volcano drifted towards Britain. AFP PHOTO / JEWEL SAMAD , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT/METOP" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by the Eumetsat on May 23, 2011 and taken by AVHRR Instrument on Metop-A on May 22 shows the ash cloud (reddish colour) billowing from the Grimsvoetn, Iceland's most active volcano. Authorities shut Iceland's airspace Sunday after the country's most active volcano began spewing ash cloud 20 kilometers into the sky, raising fears of a repeat of last year's flights chaos. While experts said the impact of the Grimsvoetn eruption should not be as far-reaching as the 2010 crisis, ash deposits were being sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west. AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT / METOP , A SAS Boeing 737 aircraft takes off behind a stranded Iceland Air Boeing 757 aircraft, named after the Eyjafjoell volcano, at Arlanda airport north of Stockholm on May 23, 2011. The Eyjafjoell aircraft is parked at Arlanda, unable to return home, since the ash cloud from the Grimsvoetn volcano closed airports in Iceland on May 22. During last year's eruption at the neighbouring Eyjafjoell volcano, more than 100,000 flights were cancelled and eight million passengers stranded, dealing a harsh blow to the airline industry, particularly in Europe. AFP PHOTO / JOHAN NILSSON - SWEDEN OUT - , Tourists leave the Islandia Hotel in Nupur as ash continue to pour out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano on May 22, 2011. Ash deposits were sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik, some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west of the volcano, which has spewed an ash cloud about 20 kilometres into the sky. Less than 24 hours after the eruption began late Saturday, experts and authorities in Iceland said the volcanic activity had begun to decline. AFP PHOTO / Vilhelm Gunnarsson ***ICELAND OUT*** , Sheep farmers try to round up a flock as they walk through a cloud of ash pouring out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano in Mulakot on May 22, 2011. Ash deposits were sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik, some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west of the volcano, which has spewed an ash cloud about 20 kilometres into the sky. Less than 24 hours after the eruption began late Saturday, experts and authorities in Iceland said the volcanic activity had begun to decline. AFP PHOTO / Vilhelm Gunnarsson ***ICELAND OUT*** , Anna Hardadottir, a farmer of Horgsland, leads a horse, through the ash pouring out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano on May 22, 2011. Ash deposits were sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik, some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west of the volcano, which has spewed an ash cloud about 20 kilometres into the sky. Less than 24 hours after the eruption began late Saturday, experts and authorities in Iceland said the volcanic activity had begun to decline. AFP PHOTO / Vilhelm Gunnarsson ***ICELAND OUT***
Lightning is seen through a cloud of smoke and ash pouring out of the erupting Grimsvoetn volcano in Grmsvoetn, Iceland, on May 22, 2011. Safety experts warned that ash from an erupting Icelandic volcano that closed the country's airspace may blow across large swathes of western Europe, raising fears of new flight chaos. Air safety officials said ash from the Grimsvoetn eruption may reach north Scotland by May 24 before sweeping across Britain to hit France and Spain two days later. AFP PHOTO / RAGNAR AXELSSON ***ICELAND OUT*** , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by the NASA Modis on May 22, 2011 shows smoke billowing from the Grimsvoetn, Iceland's most active volcano. Authorities shut Iceland's airspace Sunday after the country's most active volcano began spewing ash cloud 20 kilometers into the sky, raising fears of a repeat of last year's flights chaos. While experts said the impact of the Grimsvoetn eruption should not be as far-reaching as the 2010 crisis, ash deposits were being sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west. AFP PHOTO / NASA MODIS , A cloud of smoke and ash is seen over the Grimsvoetn volcano on Iceland on May 21, 2011. The cloud rising up from Grimsvoetn as a result of the eruption was seen first time around 1900 GMT and in less than an hour it had reached an altitude of 11 kilometres (6.8 miles)," according to the Icellandic meterological institute. AFP PHOTO , US President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama (C) board Air Force One at the airport in Dublin on May 23, 2011 en route to London. Obama was forced to leave Ireland a day ahead of schedule May 23 to fly to London as a cloud of ash from an Icelandic volcano drifted towards Britain. AFP PHOTO / JEWEL SAMAD , EDITORS NOTE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT/METOP" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS An image released by the Eumetsat on May 23, 2011 and taken by AVHRR Instrument on Metop-A on May 22 shows the ash cloud (reddish colour) billowing from the Grimsvoetn, Iceland's most active volcano. Authorities shut Iceland's airspace Sunday after the country's most active volcano began spewing ash cloud 20 kilometers into the sky, raising fears of a repeat of last year's flights chaos. While experts said the impact of the Grimsvoetn eruption should not be as far-reaching as the 2010 crisis, ash deposits were being sprinkled over the capital Reykjavik some 400 kilometres (250 miles) to the west. AFP PHOTO / EUMETSAT / METOP , A SAS Boeing 737 aircraft takes off behind a stranded Iceland Air Boeing 757 aircraft, named after the Eyjafjoell volcano, at Arlanda airport north of Stockholm on May 23, 2011. The Eyjafjoell aircraft is parked at Arlanda, unable to return home, since the ash cloud from the Grimsvoetn volcano closed airports in Iceland on May 22. During last year's eruption at the neighbouring Eyjafjoell volcano, more than 100,000 flights were cancelled and eight million passengers stranded, dealing a harsh blow to the airline industry, particularly in Europe. AFP PHOTO / JOHAN NILSSON - SWEDEN OUT -

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